Excerpts From The New Infrastructure Bill #3684 Passed By Congress

Imaginge A 30 lb. Ball & Chain – Now Imagine Carrying It Around All Day!

The Federal Government Is That Ball & Chain – What Does Any Of The Below Have To Do With Infrastructure?

NOTE: Not presented in chronological sequence this material was buried very near the end of 2700 pages. SEE INTERESTING RESPONSE BELOW ALL OF THE TEXT


SEC. 10105.
 ADVANCED DRUNK DRIVING PREVENTION TECHNOLOGY.

(a) Requirements.—

(1) MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD.—Not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Transportation shall issue a notice of proposed rulemaking to prescribe a motor vehicle safety standard under section 30111 of title 49, United States Code, that requires passenger motor vehicles manufactured after the effective date of such standard to be equipped with advanced drunk driving prevention technology. Not later than three years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall prescribe a final rule containing the motor vehicle safety standard required under this subsection. The final rule shall specify an effective date that provides at least two years, but no more than three years, to allow for manufacturing compliance.

(2) TIMING.—If the Secretary determines that a new motor vehicle safety standard required under this subsection cannot meet the requirements and considerations set forth in subsections (a) and (b) of section 30111 of title 49, United States Code, within the 3-year period required under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall—

(A) submit a report to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate describing the reasons for not prescribing such a standard within such 3-year period;

(B) not later than one year after the submission of the report under subparagraph (A), prescribe the final rule required by paragraph (1);

(C) if the Secretary cannot meet the requirements and considerations set forth in subsections (a) and (b) of section 30111 of title 49, United States Code, within the additional 1-year period described in subparagraph (B), or any subsequent 1-year period, submit a additional reports after each additional 1-year period to the committees described in subparagraph (A) describing the reasons for not prescribing such a standard within such additional period; and

(D) not later than six years after the date of enactment of this Act, prescribe a final motor vehicle safety, as required under paragraph (1).

(b) Development.—The Secretary shall work directly with manufacturers of passenger motor vehicles, suppliers, safety advocates, and other interested parties, including universities with expertise in automotive engineering, to—

(1) accelerate the development of the advanced drunk driving prevention technology required to prescribe a motor vehicle safety standard described in subsection (a); and

(2) ensure the integration of such technology into passenger motor vehicles available for sale at the earliest practicable date.

(c) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) ADVANCED DRUNK DRIVING PREVENTION TECHNOLOGY.—the term “advanced drunk driving prevention technology” means—

(A) (i) a passive system that monitors a driver’s performance to identify whether that driver may be impaired;

(ii) a system that can passively and accurately detect whether the blood alcohol concentration of a driver of a motor vehicle is equal to or greater than .08 blood alcohol content; or

(iii) a similar system that detects impairment of a driver, including a combination of systems described in paragraphs (A) and (B); and

(B) a system that prevents or limits vehicle operation if such system determines the driver may be intoxicated or otherwise impaired.

(2) MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD.—The term “motor vehicle safety standard” has the meaning given such term in section 30102 of title 49, United States Code.

(3) PASSENGER MOTOR VEHICLE.—The term “passenger motor vehicle” has the meaning given such term in section 32101 of title 49, United States Code.

SEC. 10104. UPDATING THE 5-STAR SAFETY RATING SYSTEM.

(a) In General.—Section 32302 of title 49, United States Code, is amended—

(1) by striking subsection (c);

(2) by redesignating subsection (d) as subsection (c); and

(3) by adding at the end the following:

“(d) Roadmap.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this subsection, and every 2 years thereafter, the Secretary shall publish a clear and concise report on a publicly accessible website detailing efforts over the next 5-year period to improve the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a).

“(2) ELEMENTS.—The report required under paragraph (1) shall include—

“(A) descriptions of actions that will be taken to update the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a), including the development of test procedures, test devices, and safety performance criteria;

“(B) key milestones, including the anticipated start of an action, completion of an action, and effective date of an update; and

“(C) descriptions of how an update will improve the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a).

“(3) REQUIREMENTS.—In developing and implementing the report required under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall—

“(A) identify and prioritize features and systems that meet a known safety need and for which objective and appropriate tests and evaluation criteria exist or can be developed;

“(B) when reasonable and in the interest of reducing crashes and deaths and injuries resulting from crashes, harmonize the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a) with other safety information programs, including those administered internationally or by private organizations, that provide comparisons of safety characteristics of passenger motor vehicles; and

“(C) establish objective criteria for the selection of safety features and systems to be tested.

“(4) PUBLIC COMMENT.—The Secretary shall provide for a period of public comment and review in developing the report required under paragraph (1).

“(e) Initial Updates To The 5-Star Safety Rating System.—

“(1) CRASH AVOIDANCE.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall implement, in the passenger motor vehicle information program under subsection (a), updated or new, as applicable, crash avoidance tests, which shall include tests of forward automatic emergency braking, lane departure warning, blind spot warning, rear cross traffic warning, and rear automatic emergency braking.

“(2) VULNERABLE ROAD USER SAFETY.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall implement, in the passenger motor vehicle information program under subsection (a), crash avoidance tests that assess the prevention or mitigation of crashes between a passenger motor vehicle and a pedestrian, bicyclist, or other vulnerable road user, which shall include tests of forward automatic emergency braking and rear automatic emergency braking.

“(3) NEW AND UPDATED 5-STAR SAFETY RATINGS.—Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall—

“(A) establish separate 5-star safety ratings for—

“(i) crash avoidance, which shall incorporate the tests implemented under paragraph (1); and

“(ii) pedestrian, bicyclist, and other vulnerable road user safety, which shall incorporate the tests implemented under paragraph (2); and

“(B) update the combined overall 5-star safety rating to incorporate the 5-star safety ratings established under subparagraph (A).

“(f) Advanced Updates To The 5-Star Safety Rating System.—

“(1) CRASHWORTHINESS.—

“(A) TEST PROCEDURES, CONDITIONS, AND DEVICES; INJURY CRITERIA.—Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall prescribe a final rule amending part 572 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, to incorporate into the passenger motor vehicle information program under subsection (a)—

“(i) updated and new test procedures, test conditions, and anthropomorphic test devices that reasonably represent motor vehicle occupants and pedestrians, bicyclists, and other vulnerable road users, including such occupants and users who are children, elderly individuals, adult males, and adult females; and

“(ii) new or refined injury criteria, including head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, upper leg, and lower leg injury criteria, based on real-world injuries and the greatest potential to increase the safety of passenger motor vehicles.

“(B) TESTS.—Not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall, with respect to the passenger motor vehicle information program under subsection (a)—

“(i) update existing crashworthiness tests, including to account for adult male, adult female, and elderly occupants in all designated seating positions; and

“(ii) implement new crashworthiness tests for—

“(I) occupants, including children, elderly occupants, adult males, and adult females, in all rear designated seating positions;

“(II) crashes between a passenger motor vehicle and a pedestrian, bicyclist, or other vulnerable road user, including the potential risks of injuries to the head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, upper leg, and lower leg; and

“(III) seats, the attachment assemblies of seats, and the installation of seats.

“(2) POST-CRASH SAFETY AND ADVANCED CRASH AVOIDANCE SYSTEMS.—

“(A) RESEARCH.—Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall complete research into the development of tests for—

“(i) post-crash safety systems, including tests for automatic collision notification; and

“(ii) advanced crash avoidance systems, including tests for—

“(I) lane keeping assistance;

“(II) traffic jam assist;

“(III) driver monitoring and driver distraction prevention, including tests for maintaining driver engagement and mitigating distraction from in-vehicle electronic devices;

“(IV) intelligent speed assistance; and

“(V) blind spot intervention.

“(B) IMPLEMENTATION.—After completion of the research required under subparagraph (A), and not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall implement tests for post-crash safety systems and advanced crash avoidance systems, including (at a minimum) tests for the specific capabilities described in clause (i) of such subparagraph and subclauses (I) through (V) of clause (ii) of such subparagraph, unless the Secretary determines that doing so will not improve the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a).

“(C) EXPLANATION OF DETERMINATION.—If the Secretary does not implement tests for a specific capability described in clause (i) of subparagraph (A) or any of subclauses (I) through (V) of clause (ii) of such subparagraph, the Secretary shall describe in the next report required under subsection (d)—

“(i) the reasons for the determination of the Secretary under subparagraph (B) with respect to such capability; and

“(ii) if such capability is included in another safety information program, including such a program administered by an international or private organization, why the tests, or substantially similar tests, from such other program were not adopted.

“(3) NEW AND UPDATED 5-STAR SAFETY RATINGS.—Not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall—

“(A) establish separate 5-star safety ratings for—

“(i) crashworthiness for adults;

“(ii) crashworthiness for elderly occupants; and

“(iii) crashworthiness for children;

“(B) update the crash avoidance 5-star safety rating to incorporate the post-crash safety and advanced crash avoidance tests implemented under paragraph (2)(B); and

“(C) update the combined overall 5-star safety rating to incorporate the 5-star safety ratings established under subparagraph (A) and the 5-star safety rating updated under subparagraph (B).

“(g) Advanced Drunk Driving Prevention Technology.—

“(1) RESEARCH.—Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall complete research into the development of tests for advanced drunk driving prevention technology.

“(2) IMPLEMENTATION.—After completion of the research required under paragraph (1), and not later than 4 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall implement tests for advanced drunk driving prevention technology, unless the Secretary determines that doing so will not improve the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a).

“(3) EXPLANATION OF DETERMINATION.—If the Secretary does not implement tests for advanced drunk driving prevention technology, the Secretary shall describe in the next report required under subsection (d)—

“(A) the reasons for the determination of the Secretary under paragraph (2); and

“(B) if advanced drunk driving prevention technology is included in another safety information program, including such a program administered by an international or private organization, the Secretary shall detail why the tests, or substantially similar tests, from such other program were not adopted.

“(4) UPDATED 5-STAR SAFETY RATINGS.—Not later than 4 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall—

“(A) update the crash avoidance 5-star safety rating to incorporate any tests for advanced drunk driving prevention technology implemented under paragraph (2); and

“(B) update the combined overall 5-star safety rating to incorporate any updates to the crash avoidance 5-star safety rating under subparagraph (A).

“(h) Updating The Monroney Label.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 4 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Secretary shall prescribe a final rule revising part 575 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, to update the safety rating information required to be displayed on stickers placed on motor vehicles by their manufacturers (commonly referred to as ‘Monroney Labels’).

“(2) REQUIREMENTS.—In carrying out paragraph (1), the Secretary shall require that crash avoidance information is indicated next to crashworthiness information on the stickers described in such paragraph.

“(i) Safety Ratings.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—The 5-star safety ratings shall—

“(A) provide consumers with easy-to-understand information about passenger motor vehicle safety;

“(B) provide meaningful comparative information about the safety of passenger motor vehicles; and

“(C) provide incentives for the design of safer passenger motor vehicles.

“(2) STANDARD SYSTEMS OR FEATURES.—A vehicle model shall only achieve the highest safety rating under the passenger motor vehicle information program under subsection (a) if each system or feature that is subject to a test under such program is standard for the model.

“(3) PUBLIC AVAILABILITY.—Not later than 30 days after providing the safety ratings under the passenger motor vehicle information program under subsection (a) for a passenger motor vehicle to the manufacturer of the vehicle, the Secretary shall publish such safety ratings on a website that is publicly available and easily accessible (including on mobile devices).

“(j) Continuous Updates.—

“(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 6 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, and every 2 years thereafter, the Secretary shall—

“(A) update the passenger motor vehicle information program under subsection (a) to expand consumer access to information about passenger motor vehicle safety in accordance with the roadmap required under subsection (d); and

“(B) update each test or 5-star safety rating implemented under this section, unless the Secretary determines that updating the test or 5-star safety rating will not improve the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a).

“(2) REPLACING AND ELIMINATING TESTS AND 5-STAR SAFETY RATINGS.—

“(A) IN GENERAL.—If the Secretary determines that a test or 5-star safety rating implemented under this section no longer improves the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a), the Secretary shall—

“(i) replace such test or 5-star safety rating; or

“(ii) if the Secretary determines that a replacement of such test or 5-star safety rating will not improve the passenger motor vehicle information developed under subsection (a), eliminate such test or 5-star safety rating.

“(B) EXPLANATION OF DETERMINATION.—If the Secretary eliminates a test or 5-star safety rating under subparagraph (A)(ii), the Secretary shall provide an explanation for the determination of the Secretary under such subparagraph in the next report required under subsection (d).

“(k) Report On Failure To Meet Deadline.—If the Secretary fails to meet a deadline under this section, the Secretary shall, not later than 30 days after the deadline, submit to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report containing—

“(1) an explanation of why the Secretary failed to meet the deadline; and

“(2) a detailed plan and projected timeline for completing the requirement to which the deadline relates.

“(l) Definitions.—In this section:

“(1) 5-STAR SAFETY RATING.—The term ‘5-star safety rating’ means a graphical depiction of a rating assigned under the passenger motor vehicle information program under subsection (a).

“(2) CRASHWORTHINESS.—The term ‘crashworthiness’ has the meaning given such term in section 32301, except that such term also includes the protection a passenger motor vehicle gives pedestrians, bicyclists, and other vulnerable road users against personal injury or death from a motor vehicle accident.”.

(b) Authorization Of Appropriations.—There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Transportation $75,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2022 through 2027 to carry out the amendments made by this section.

SEC. 10105. ADVANCED DRUNK DRIVING PREVENTION TECHNOLOGY.

(a) Requirements.—

(1) MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD.—Not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Transportation shall issue a notice of proposed rulemaking to prescribe a motor vehicle safety standard under section 30111 of title 49, United States Code, that requires passenger motor vehicles manufactured after the effective date of such standard to be equipped with advanced drunk driving prevention technology. Not later than three years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall prescribe a final rule containing the motor vehicle safety standard required under this subsection. The final rule shall specify an effective date that provides at least two years, but no more than three years, to allow for manufacturing compliance.

(2) TIMING.—If the Secretary determines that a new motor vehicle safety standard required under this subsection cannot meet the requirements and considerations set forth in subsections (a) and (b) of section 30111 of title 49, United States Code, within the 3-year period required under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall—

(A) submit a report to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate describing the reasons for not prescribing such a standard within such 3-year period;

(B) not later than one year after the submission of the report under subparagraph (A), prescribe the final rule required by paragraph (1);

(C) if the Secretary cannot meet the requirements and considerations set forth in subsections (a) and (b) of section 30111 of title 49, United States Code, within the additional 1-year period described in subparagraph (B), or any subsequent 1-year period, submit a additional reports after each additional 1-year period to the committees described in subparagraph (A) describing the reasons for not prescribing such a standard within such additional period; and

(D) not later than six years after the date of enactment of this Act, prescribe a final motor vehicle safety, as required under paragraph (1).

(b) Development.—The Secretary shall work directly with manufacturers of passenger motor vehicles, suppliers, safety advocates, and other interested parties, including universities with expertise in automotive engineering, to—

(1) accelerate the development of the advanced drunk driving prevention technology required to prescribe a motor vehicle safety standard described in subsection (a); and

(2) ensure the integration of such technology into passenger motor vehicles available for sale at the earliest practicable date.

(c) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) ADVANCED DRUNK DRIVING PREVENTION TECHNOLOGY.—the term “advanced drunk driving prevention technology” means—

(A) (i) a passive system that monitors a driver’s performance to identify whether that driver may be impaired;

(ii) a system that can passively and accurately detect whether the blood alcohol concentration of a driver of a motor vehicle is equal to or greater than .08 blood alcohol content; or

(iii) a similar system that detects impairment of a driver, including a combination of systems described in paragraphs (A) and (B); and

(B) a system that prevents or limits vehicle operation if such system determines the driver may be intoxicated or otherwise impaired.

(2) MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD.—The term “motor vehicle safety standard” has the meaning given such term in section 30102 of title 49, United States Code.

(3) PASSENGER MOTOR VEHICLE.—The term “passenger motor vehicle” has the meaning given such term in section 32101 of title 49, United States Code.

SEC. 10103. 21ST CENTURY SMART CARS.

(a) Crash Avoidance Rulemaking.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Subchapter II of chapter 301 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by section 10101(a)(1), is further amended by adding at the end the following new section:

“§ 30130. Crash avoidance rulemaking

“(a) In General.—Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall issue final rules prescribing motor vehicle safety standards that—

“(1) establish minimum performance requirements for the crash avoidance systems described in subsection (b); and

“(2) require all new passenger motor vehicles manufactured for sale in the United States, introduced or delivered for introduction in interstate commerce, or imported into the United States to be equipped with the crash avoidance systems described in subsection (b).

“(b) Crash Avoidance Systems.—The Secretary shall issue motor vehicle safety standards for each of the following crash avoidance systems—

“(1) forward collision warning and automatic emergency braking that detects potential collisions with vehicles, objects, pedestrians, bicyclists, and other vulnerable road users while the vehicle is traveling forward, provides a warning to the driver, and automatically applies the brakes to avoid or mitigate the severity of a collision;

“(2) rear automatic emergency braking that detects a potential collision with vehicles, objects, pedestrians, bicyclists, and other vulnerable roads user while a vehicle is traveling in reverse and automatically applies the brakes to avoid or mitigate the severity of a collision;

“(3) rear cross traffic warning that detects vehicles, objects, pedestrians, bicyclists, and other vulnerable road users approaching from the side and rear of a vehicle as it travels in reverse and alerts the driver;

“(4) lane departure warning that monitors a vehicle’s position in its lane and alerts the driver as the vehicle approaches or crosses lane markers; and

“(5) blind spot warning that detects a vehicle, pedestrian, bicyclist , and other vulnerable road user to the side or rear of a vehicle and alerts the driver to their presence, including when a driver attempts to change the course of travel toward another vehicle or road user in the blind zone of the vehicle.

“(c) Considerations.—In prescribing the motor vehicle safety standards required in subsection (a), the Secretary shall require that the crash avoidance systems—

“(1) perform effectively at speeds for which a passenger motor vehicle is designed to operate, including on city streets and highways; and

“(2) include self-diagnostic capability and warning when inoperable.

“(d) Compliance Date.—The compliance date of the standards prescribed under subsection (a) shall not exceed more than 2 years from the date final rules are issued.

“(e) Rulemaking On Point Of Sale Information.—Not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall issue a final rule to require clear and concise information about the capabilities and limitations of advanced crash avoidance systems described in subsection (b) to be provided to a consumer at the point of sale and in the vehicle owner’s manual, including a publicly accessible electronic owner’s manual.

“(f) Headlamps.—

“(1) FINAL RULE.—Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall issue a final rule amending section 571.108 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations to—

“(A) improve illumination of the roadway;

“(B) prevent glare;

“(C) establish minimum performance standards for—

“(i) semi-automatic headlamp beam switching;

“(ii) curve adaptive headlamps; and

“(iii) adaptive driving beam headlamp technology.

“(2) COMPLIANCE DATE.—The compliance date of the revised standard prescribed under paragraph (1) shall not exceed more than 2 years from the effective date.

“(3) FINAL RULEMAKING REQUIRED.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall finalize the Rulemaking (83 Fed. Reg. 51766) to permit the certification of adaptive driving beam headlighting systems.

“(g) Definitions.—In this section:

“(1) CRASH AVOIDANCE.—The term ‘crash avoidance’ has the meaning given to that term in section 32301.

“(2) PASSENGER MOTOR VEHICLE.—The term ‘passenger motor vehicle’ has the meaning given to that term in section 32101.”.

(2) CONFORMING AMENDMENT.—The table of sections for subchapter II of chapter 301 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by section 10101(a)(2), is further amended by adding at the end the following new item:
“30130. Crash avoidance rulemaking.”.

(b) Research Of Advanced Crash Systems.—

(1) IN GENERAL.—Subchapter II of chapter 301 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by section 10101(a)(1) and subsection (a)(1), is further amended by adding at the end the following new section:

“§ 30131. Advanced crash systems research and consumer education

“(a) Advanced Crash Systems Research.—

“(1) RESEARCH REQUIRED.—Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall complete research into the following:

“(A) Direct driver monitoring systems that will minimize driver disengagement, driver distraction, prevent automation complacency, and foreseeable misuse of vehicle automation.

“(B) Lane keeping assistance that assists with steering to keep a vehicle within its driving lane.

“(C) Automatic collision notification systems that—

“(i) notify emergency responders that a crash has occurred and provide the geographical location of the vehicle and crash data in a manner that allows for assessment of potential injuries and emergency response; and

“(ii) transfer to the Secretary anonymized automatic crash data for the purposes of safety research and statistical analysis.

“(D) Intelligent Speed Assist that—

“(i) determines the applicable speed limit where the vehicle is operating; and

“(ii) alerts the driver to the current speed limit and discourages exceeding that limit.

“(2) REQUIREMENTS.—In conducting the research required under subsection (a), the Secretary shall—

“(A) develop one or more tests to evaluate the performance of the systems;

“(B) determine criteria that would be reasonable and practicable at evaluating the performance of the systems; and

“(C) determine fail, pass, or advanced pass criteria to assure the systems are performing their intended function.

“(3) REPORT.—The Secretary shall submit a report detailing findings from the research required under subsection (a) to the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this Act.

“(4) RULEMAKING.—Not later than 4 years after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall issue final rules to establish motor vehicle safety standards for the advanced crash systems described in this subsection and to require all new passenger motor vehicles manufactured for sale in the United States, introduced or delivered for introduction in interstate commerce, or imported into the United States produced after the compliance date of such standards to be equipped with advanced crash avoidance systems described in this subsection.

“(5) LEAD-TIME.—The compliance date of the standards prescribed under this section shall not exceed more than 2 model years from the date a motor vehicle safety standard is finalized.

“(6) CRASH DATA.—If the Secretary makes a determination that establishing a motor vehicle safety standard described in paragraph (1)(C)(ii) does not meet the requirements and considerations set forth in subsections (a) and (b) of section 30111 of title 49, United States Code, the Secretary—

“(A) shall submit a report describing the reasons for reaching such a determination to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation in the Senate; and

“(B) may not issue such a standard.

“(b) Definitions.—In this section:

“(1) CRASH AVOIDANCE.—The term ‘crash avoidance’ has the meaning given to that term in section 32301.

“(2) PASSENGER MOTOR VEHICLE.—The term ‘passenger motor vehicle’ has the meaning given to that term in section 32101.”.

(2) CONFORMING AMENDMENT.—The table of sections for subchapter II of chapter 301 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by section 10101(a)(2) and subsection (a)(2), is further amended by adding at the end the following new item:

SEC. 10102. RULEMAKING TO INSTALL AUTOMATIC SHUTOFF SYSTEMS AND ROLLAWAY PREVENTION TECHNOLOGY IN MOTOR VEHICLES.

(a) Definitions.—In this section:

(1) ELECTRIC VEHICLE.—The term “electric vehicle”—

(A) means a vehicle that does not include an engine and is powered solely by an external source of electricity, solar power, or both;

(B) does not include an electric hybrid vehicle that uses a chemical fuel such as gasoline or diesel fuel.

(2) KEY.—The term “key” has the meaning given the term in section 571.114 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (or successor regulations).

(3) MANUFACTURER.—The term “manufacturer” has the meaning given the term in section 30102(a) of title 49, United States Code.

(4) MOTOR VEHICLE.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—The term “motor vehicle” has the meaning given the term in section 30102(a) of title 49, United States Code.

(B) EXCLUSIONS.—The term “motor vehicle” does not include—

(i) a motorcycle or trailer (as those terms are defined in section 571.3 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations) (or successor regulations);

(ii) any motor vehicle that is rated at more than 10,000 pounds gross vehicular weight; or

(iii) for purposes of subsection (b), a battery electric vehicle.

(5) SECRETARY.—The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of Transportation.

(b) Automatic Shutoff Systems For Motor Vehicles.—

(1) FINAL RULE.—

(A) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall issue a final rule amending section 571.114 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (relating to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard Number 114), to require manufacturers to install in each motor vehicle equipped with a keyless ignition device and an internal combustion engine technology to automatically shut off the motor vehicle after the motor vehicle has idled for the period designated under subparagraph (B).

(B) PERIOD DESCRIBED.—

(i) IN GENERAL.—The period referred to in subparagraph (A) is the period designated by the Secretary as necessary to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

(ii) DIFFERENT PERIODS.—The Secretary may designate different periods under clause (i) for different types of motor vehicles, depending on the rate at which the motor vehicle emits carbon monoxide, if—

(I) the Secretary determines a different period is necessary for a type of motor vehicle for purposes of section 30111 of title 49, United States Code; and

(II) requiring a different period for a type of motor vehicle is consistent with the prevention of carbon monoxide poisoning.

(2) DEADLINE.—The rule under paragraph (1) shall become effective not later than 2 years after the date on which the Secretary issues such rule.

(c) Preventing Motor Vehicles From Rolling Away.—

(1) REQUIREMENT.—Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall issue a final rule amending part 571 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, to require manufacturers to install technology to prevent movement of motor vehicles equipped with keyless ignition devices and automatic transmissions if—

(A) the transmission of the motor vehicle is not in the park setting;

(B) the motor vehicle does not exceed the speed determined by the Secretary under paragraph (2);

(C) the seat belt of the operator of the motor vehicle is unbuckled;

(D) the service brake of the motor vehicle is not engaged; and

(E) the door for the operator of the motor vehicle is open.

(2) DETERMINATION.—The Secretary shall determine the maximum speed at which a motor vehicle may be safely locked in place under the conditions described in subparagraphs (A), (C), (D), and (E) of paragraph (1) to prevent vehicle rollaways.

(3) DEADLINE.—The rule under paragraph (1) shall become effective not later than 2 years after the date on which the Secretary issues such rule.

Reader response below:

(1) Suppose I am threatened by a wildfire, hurricane, robber, or the like, and my drunk-preventing ignition fails (gives a false positive reading)? My fixed instruction to my heirs is to sue the U.S. government for $70 million. This is not idle speculation. For example, my present car has Theft Prevention that has failed several times.


(2). Suppose I get stranded on a highway in Canada in mid-winter? (This really happened.). I leave the engine on, to run the heater so as not to freeze to death. Now the brilliant idea Idle Detector turns off the engine and I do indeed freeze. Again, see you in court, USA.

Pensiamento’s response below:

The one size fits all Socialist mentality which is either based upon an IQ below 100 or on evil intent, or both, cannot foresee anything happening outside of their myopic viewpoint which is always poorly thought out, very short sighted and generally emotionally driven.

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Pensamiento Peligroso writes the truth as he sees it, and if it upsets you, then it makes you think!

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THERE ARE  25 LINKS AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE ON THE RIGHT SIDE – OTHER REPUTABLE SITES FOR YOUR EDIFICATION INCLUDING G. Edward Griffin, John Stossel, Walter Williams, Zero Hedge to name a few.

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